Some sampling do’s and don’t for beat makers



This title may be misleading. The point of this is not to tell you what samples might get you sued or what has already been used on previously released song.. No, this is a bit different. My idea here is to list certain red flags you should keep an eye out for when going through a record/records. These things are a quick way for you to know what to skip over and not waste your time on. Basically, this is my guide to shortcut crate digging.
Keep in mind, every producer is different. One mans trash and all that shit…So, this is what I avoid when I’m going through records:

Acoustic guitars
Now, I’m not saying all acoustic guitars are bad for sampling. Sometimes you’ll hear a great riff and it works fine. I’ve certainly used some in my career. However, 99% of the time it’s some boring ass chord progression , weakly played and questionably recorded. Anytime I hear a beat made with one of these as the main loop, I know that motherfucker who made it was just being lazy. It passes off as some emotional , mellow groove but really it’s just crappy. Acoustic guitar chord progressions are for singer/songwriter types to use merely as background to their song writing. They aren’t meant to stand on their own. The second you hear that first wimpy strum, skip over that shit…in fact, be prepared to skip the whole album cause 9/10 times all the songs will sound the same.

Laughing/crying
This is kinda random but anytime a song begins with a person laughing or crying, I’ve noticed it leads into some bullshit. Either some fluffy cornball song about a baby being born or some song about a dead person set to a completely forgettable backdrop. If you hear either of these sounds, skip it. It only gets worse from there.
On a similar note, anytime a song starts with a clock ticking or spaceship sounds, you might be about to hear something awesome.

Loud drums
Unless your one of those lazy producers who simply loops some shit and calls it a beat, samples with drums in them are not your friend. Sure, you can work around them but if they are dominating the loop, it usually won’t work, if you plan on adding more layers to it. I can’t count how many times i’ve heard an amazing loop that I simply didn’t end up using cause they recorded the drums too loudly and no filtering could fix that. I say, look for samples without the drums in them. At worst, samples with some light percussion. But if you hear some that sounds like a finished beat before you even sample it, just let it go or save it for a mix tape track.

Watch the time signature/swing
It blows my mind when I hear a producer try and loop a sample that’s obviously in a swing rhythm and try and make into a boom bap type track. Being a producer is pretty easy. In terms of musical theory, we’re an ignorant bunch yet we manage to get away with it. But we should at least be able to recognize that , sometimes, loops are just not gonna work due to the swing. There are exceptions to this (“Guns and cigarettes” By Atmosphere is a good example of it working out well) but usually it just leads to a confusing track that just doesn’t sit right on the drums. unless you’re making instrumental beats, there’s a good chance you’ll never need a swing rhythm track for an MC. Some can rock that kinda track but they’re few and far between.
The same goes for samples that are not in 4/4 time signature. I don’t care how dope a loop it is, sometimes you just have to accept that it’s not gonna work how you want it to. Unless your name is Mumbles and you’re working with Aceyalone on “A book of human language”, non-4/4 beats are risky to pull off (where rappers are concerned).

Never underestimate filtering
Sometimes you have a loop you like but it’s too crowded. There are drums in it, horns, and all sorts of little sounds. But, really, you just wanna have it as a loop that will be the spine of the beat. So, filter that shit. Make it into a baseline (if that’s possible). Not only will it open up possibilities for layering but it also will hide the sample better from how it sounded originally and you can worry less about getting sued.

Some genres just don’t work
Again, there are exceptions for all these rules….but sometimes you just need to give up on trying to flip that hawaiian hula record. Certain genres just aren’t made for sampling. Let’s go through some:
1)Hawaiian music
2)Polka
3)old country music (though you might find some great vocals in them)
4)most ethnic music heavy in percussion
5)Classical music (not cause it’s unusable, but because it’s just corny to me to sample classical music)
6)Jazz before 1950
7)most opera music

Music that will frustrate you
First off, Fuck free jazz. It’s the most annoying shit to try and sample cause it’s usually atonal and all over the place. I’ve found bits and pieces over the years but it meant wading through hours of pretentious mayhem disguised as music. Skip it.
Secondly, every now and then, you’ll come across an artist who seems like they would have endless dope samples. But, for some reason, they never do. Case in point: Jean Luc Ponty
This dude is an fusion-y electric violin player from the 70’s. His album covers look like acid trips (always a good sign when digging), they’re always in the dollar bin and they always have amazing sounds on them. The only problem is, for some reason, this Ponty motherfucker refused to leave anything open. It’s like he’s constantly got 8 instruments going at once so you can never extract that one little sound you like. It’s extra frustrating cause he would have all sorts of awesome sounds going. I mean electric violin! It’s so perfect for sampling but, alas, no dice. There are tons of artists like this and , at some point, you gotta stop chasing the dragon and just stop buying their records. I’ll admit, I bought like 6 of his records before I finally quit him. fuck that guy.

The “Everything sounds the same” curse

I’ll often come across a record that specializes in one sound. A flute, or a klezmer or a vocal group from Botswana. These records are perfect for finding layers cause they never have drums and they’re full of random little riffs that you can work with. The issue here is controlling yourself. These records are good for one, MAYBE 2 uses. It will be tempting to constantly go back to them cause they’re so ripe for the picking, but just hold you head. the best you can do if go through it and find the best possible part and use that. Another downside to these types of records is that they all sound exactly the same. Every flute song sounds like the last flute song. So, prepare for a tedious journey.
Take it from me. I raped some old flute records when I was coming up and I’m still shaking the “guy who samples tons of flutes” stigma to this very day.

Well, that’s just for starters. hope that helped some of you wet behind the ears beat makers. If you got anymore questions about this kinda shit, feel free to ask below.

90 thoughts on “Some sampling do’s and don’t for beat makers

  1. Hahahah fuck Jean Luc Ponty. I got a couple decent bites off him, but you’re right, it’s a lot of work. Tons of jazz fusion stuff from the 70s is like that–way too over-arranged to be useful at all.

  2. Great points man, sincerely! I’ve been dying to hear someone successfully sample “Dancing Machine” by Jackson 5. Also, I just discovered an Italian composer by the name of Piero Umiliani. He’s got a an entire library chock full of sampling possibilities. Just stay the hell away from Crepuscolo Sul Mare. It’s mine.

  3. whoa, this has got to be one of your better posts. Just nice to understand some of the thinking behind production and makes me appreciate good production even more.

  4. What’s your opinion on sampling something that is really well-known? Obviously not for a major label release, but for a mixtape or something? Is that corny, or is it appropriate in context?

      • My bad, I was at my office when I originally read this and youtube is blocked, didn’t even notice the video. Thanks! I know this track, can’t believe I didn’t realize it was Jackson 5.

      • That’s bananas that I never caught that sample on “Move” but I will admit I RARELY sample when making beats(I’m a multi-instrumentalist, so I just don’t have that ear for sampling when thinking about music ideas), so I usually don’t go digging on old tracks like that. Also, Q-Tip picked up this track for “The Renaissance.” I originally thought Tip produced it, it has his vibe all over it.

  5. i found one of my dad’s old jean luc ponty records apparently he used to smoke to it in the 70’s thats funny you mention him

  6. Yo man, I really like your tips and guidance…

    I go through loads of random material myself to find the bits I want. Get seriously into just trying to extract as many workable elements (hits and loops) out of each single track.

    Can you expand on that whole point about filtering busy ish? Like how you do that kind of thing?

    Your blog is quality, and so are your tunes.

    Peace

    • Well, I tend to filter when I want to get high or low end out. If you have a sample that has a dope bassline but it also has drums and high pitched sounds in it, filter as much of the high out as possible and that will often leave you with a really dope , rumbling bassline. 90’s hip hop production was built on that. Other time, you’ll ehar a sample with a dope high part but you won’t want the bass tone in it, then just filter away the lows.

      • Thanks. I appreciate the tips. I assume EQ’ing is what I should use to do this?

        I’m sorry, but I’m still got loads to learn in this whole production thing, so hope I aint coming across too stupid.

        Peace

  7. “Some Genres Just Don’t Work” reads to me like a list of challenges. Although sometimes you gotta learn the lesson the hard way.

  8. Good shit block. I’m still kinda weary of sampling in general. I mainly wanna sample people singing and not necessarily instruments, though I’m not opposed. What’s your take on that? Obviously I couldn’t do like Kanye and sample tons of stuff cuz he pays for the rights haha, but yeah.

  9. Lol @ the Ponty dis. Good write up.
    Free Jazz is a good source for small sound pieces that you might have as just some extra noises over a filtered loop. Filtering never gets old, there’s always a use for it. I only wish I had that rack piece EQ/Filter joint that Akai stopped making years ago, for my MPC.

    ALso agree on the acoustic guitar shit. I automatically don’t like a rap song if I hear a guitar and I automatically completely skip records if they have acoustic guitars in the background. Can’t count how many times a guitar in the background, no matter how minimal, has ruined loops for me.

    I do think certain producers can and have pulled off certain loops without adding drums though. But it really has to be some other shit that can really stand on its own. Comes off as raw sometimes. I can’t think of any examples off the top of the head, maybe RZA has done this a few times in the past?

  10. Here’s a tip: Don’t chop and re-arrange stuff just for the sake of doing so. I was listening to something a little while ago and noticed all these chops done for absolutely no reason. Sounded annoying and stupid and like they were trying to sound like Primo and failing at it.

      • I can’t get away from that because sometimes I have this problem using a loop straight up. I dunno. I’ve always been like that. I think it’s because i idolize DJ Premier so much that I want to try and transform everything. I remember the first time I heard the Guitar Watson sample I was pissed. Das EFX “They Want EFX” was one of my favorite beats of all time. When I realized they took the loop straight up I felt like they cheated. There seemed to be no effort in it to me. But I guess the idea is, it doesn’t matter what you did or didn’t do. All that matters is how it sounds when it’s done. I am trying to be more like that instead of chopping the hell out of things. I also tend to try and make a beat of anything instead of being selective about what I sample. I am making the torn towards more atmospheric beats.

      • There’s nothing wrong with loops. Just don’t loop some shit and call it a day. Add drums, bass lines and other sounds and samples. Build a beat. In my eyes, a beat should have changes…not just a repetitive thing that never switches up at all. Back in the day it was okay but it’s 2011, step it up and try and make it more musical.

  11. interesting read. You’ve used some amazing classical guitar samples in the past. Acoustic Thug is the first that comes to mind, the end of Attack the Doctor, etc.

    • Oh, I sample guitars like a mad man. In just avoid the folk strumming. I hate that shit. Every now and then, one will sneak through but , in general, I’ll skip right over the entire record if I hear three of those type songs in a row.

  12. just wanted to say very impressive the way you flipped that percussion around the world record for the cage joint on hells winter( cherubs something?) daps. Also what do you think about the new way people acquire music (downloads mostly) as relating to not getting a physical copy and reading liner notes? I mean does this stifle potential interest in the producer, do artists like yourself feel less sought after? are these questions to backpacky? hah

    • People not buying physical copies or caring about liner notes is just a way of life now. I don’t like it but it’s pointless to complain. On the bright side, only people who really cared read the liner notes back in the day anyway. i’d imagine the same people still are curious as to who makes what and look online to find out.

  13. what percentage of your beatmaking is done on hardware vs. software? could you still make music with one and not the other?

  14. I did have a question about basslines for you. Do you generally find a dope sample and turn it into a bassline like you said, or sample a bass guitar/synth, or do you compose the bassline yourself? I’m fairly new to the sampling game and basslines have always been my weak point. The bassline from Only Sequences change is so sick!

    I will admit, I’m guilty of the guitar sampling as well, but not so much a “folky” sound, just riffs and stabs here and there. Great post. I really enjoy your music so it’s cool to see you throwing those tips out there for everybody!

  15. i’m an mc so i don’t get too involved in the production process aside from hunting for sounds, but if i’m looking for some emotional guitar that doesn’t sound corny, how can i narrow down my search to fewer choices? i’ve heard eyedea sample the song “is there anybody out there?” by pink floyd on the oliver hart album, i also think that ant made some really dope beats with emotional guitar on god loves ugly. any suggestions as to what i should look into and what i should avoid? thanks, great post too, i’ll show this to my friend who makes the beats.

    • indie rock is amazing for that “little emotional guitar” sound, it’s like a whole genre based around that beatles-esque style. they have some good guitar riffs and there’s rarely much clutter, you may even be lucky enough to find a track with only vocals and an acoustic guitar. just add some effects and filters and you can make sure it doesn’t sound corny. ( i still dont get that, acoustic guitar doesnt sound corny to me, you just gotta look in the right places) but anyways, i’d look up groups like the strokes, the shins, the foals, bombay bicycle club, arctic monkeys, say hi to your mom, bloc party and i know there’s a bunch more i’m forgetting but that should get you started,

  16. i didnt even realize this was blockhead until right when i was about to comment, that’s really cool you’re doing this, i wish i would have found this site when i had no idea what i was doing. but i really like your work bro, i wish i had the time to get into it more, but to be honest, i just get mad any time i listen to other producers because i never think i’m as good and because of that i always feel like i need to be working. but anyways keep up the good work bro, it’s unreal. but to the question, i’m used to making more of a midwest boom-bap beat that is similar to j-dilla and pete rock in that my drums are pretty loud and clear, but i kind of want to mix that style with more of an experimental flylo/shlohmo like sound with my melodies and complex percussion but i don’t really know where to look for those kind of sounds. i dont want to give you the wrong idea, i’m not trying to snake these producer’s styles it’s just that i’ve learned a lot from listening to them and i want to take that and make my own original sound, just getting an idea of what they sample for whatever sound can help me so much in how i chop and arrange my beat. recently i’ve even been getting into sun ra a lot and shit and i know he was a big influence to cosmogramma but thats really it. any suggestions? another question is would it be a worthwhile investment to snag myself and mpc and some other equipment? i’ve been working for years on the demo version for fl studio and it’s getting a little frustrating that i can’t save my work and i’d really like to actually make beats the right way, especially if it makes turning my ideas into a beat faster and easier. i think that’s about it, thanks duder!

    • Honestly, I’ve always found my drums sounds just organically. I’ve never sought out certain types so I could make certain types of beats. I wouldn’t even know where to begin with that.
      As for your equipment question, I’d say yes. Get something. It can be hardware or software but don’t just work with a programs demo. It’s too limiting.

      • with the drums i just feel like certain types of drum sounds fit better with different subgenres of hip hop, like if i were making a track for the club i might layer my snare with a light clap but if i’m making a chill jazzy beat i’m gonna go with a ‘boom bap’ sound and i might layer it with something that sounds metallic so it really has that crack sound. but thanks for the advice, i know i already said it but it really is awesome you’re doing this when i don’t think any other producer would care enough to help others out like you’re doing. makes you seem like a really chill dude, i’m definitely a bigger fan now. have a good one bro.

  17. Uh…I disagree with some of these techniques. I mean,most Hip Hop beats are stretched 4 or 8 bar loops. Some beats are only two tracks. It’s only the younger generation of Hip Hop producers who are being overly methodical and have all these complex approaches to making beats. One of the main elements about most Hip Hop is that it’s raw. It didn’t matter how simple a beat was, or how long it took someone to make. Now, with this new generation, all these trivial non-sense with dumb ass rules exist. It’s annoying. Just make a beat. If it sounds good, then cool, if not, then try again. I’m sure there is a producers who creativity violated every rule spoken here, and made a dope beat. Just make some damn music and stop thinking some damn hard!

    • Well, I’m an old school guy so your point is kinda moot. If you want to make beats with a loop and a break, by all means, have at it. But I would personally never make something so simply BECAUSE I know what it takes to make a beat. Just looping shit, while effective and responsible for some of the best rap tracks ever, is still lazy creativity. ESPECIALLY in 2013. I’ve been making beats with the same ideals since the mid 90’s. BUt, hey, that’s just me. Do you , bro.

  18. I dig the mid to late 60’s records when they first switched to stereo from mono. It’s a good and easy way to sample drums or bass or any Sounds, really. just sample the left or right channel to leave out that other shit you don’t want. That and the way drums were mixed back then was dope. They’re usually pretty strong and loud.

  19. Great post, thanks! I am not a beat maker yet (but I wanna try someday) so I don’t know much about sampling but there is only one thing I would disagree: “Jazz before 1950s doesn’t work”. I think it depends on what you want to do. In the 1930s and the 1940s many jazz tunes have amazing solos that can be turned easily into a loop in my opinion. Anyway, it’s just an amateur point of view!

  20. Yo, how many records do you grab before you take a break and listen to them? And how long do you listen to them when your checking them out? Sometimes I feel like I’m that guy that goes to the bookstore and reads entire books but never buys any. Should I watch out for this or am just being paranoid?

  21. This is an old ass post, so I’m not sure if you’re going to see this, but let’s go for it:

    What are some good ways to find obscure musicians of varied genres to sample on the internet? I know Bandcamp is a great resource, but they tend to rank things by popularity, which makes it hard.

    I know you don’t really enjoy this sort of question; you’re just such a great person to ask because you don’t blow smoke.

    • There are tons of music blog that specialize in obscure shit. And they all focus on one type of sound. Some are psych rock blogs others are lounge music, etc…The problem is finding ones that are not only still running but that have music links that still work. People have been cracking down like crazy the last year or so.

      • Cause the blogs are giving away whole albums for free. More so than that, though, is the upload services are not trying to get caught giving away licensed music without permission.

      • Ahhh. Understood.

        Yeah. On Bandcamp I found a bunch of music that I’d like to try sampling but it’s just not worth spending money on.

        Thanks for the replies; have a good day.

  22. And please avoid random sound effects that aren’t pleasant to the ear. I love Creative Differences by Living Legends but that squeaking tricycle or whatever the fuck it is is so annoying. Especially since I was at work and I thought one of my machines was malfunctioning.

  23. Good tidings and stuff

    Firstly, like you I will start with a disclaimer:

    The quotes have been altered in an attempt to capture their “essence” or general idea.

    The tools and techniques used to execute production vary, claiming one to be superior is principally a subjective point. A case and point would include things such as producing “warmth” in a record to using an MPC 60 as opposed to the latest version of FL Studio/Reason/Cubase/Nuendo/ad nauseum because it sounds “punchy”.

    Empirically proven aspects such as bit depth/truncation and response times (time between playing a riff and it coming out the speakers) are not covered in the following.

    Acoustic guitars

    However, 99% of the time it’s some boring ass chord progression , weakly played and questionably recorded.

    Laughing/crying
    This is kinda random but anytime a song begins with a person laughing or crying, I’ve noticed it leads into some bullshit.

    My Take

    By simply ignoring these, you limit the amount of experience you gain in digital audio processing and production. Weak acoustic solos are superb in teaching one how to layer a beat to create a sense of depth.

    The bland progressions are also a crucial step in stumping out the redundancy inherent in boom bap. I for instance find a 4min loop of 4-8 bars as redundant as a three chord progression played over an entire blues album. By having a producer sample bland repetitive loops it is possible to foster a dislike for redundancy, which later on in his career leads to programming (drums and samples) and sequencing that is anything but linear.

    Boom bap need not be a 4min bore!

    Example: M-Phases – Take it from me ft. Illy

    Loud drums

    Unless you[‘re] one of those lazy producers who simply loops some shit and calls it a beat, samples with drums in them are not your friend

    [Example: Busta Rhymes – New York Shit ft. Swiss Beats (Dj Scratch loops/samples SSO Band’s Faded Lady]

    My Take

    Again, by avoiding these, you take away experience from the future producers. A simple work around is cutting out the drums and restitching the loop.

    Alternatively, fade in the portions that have drums in them (learn to alter envelopes). Chop according to beats instead of bars for easy access to drums when opting to fade the in

    Secondly, drum fills towards the end of a loop are lovely, but if you feel that the sound is far too different from those you have programmed, learn about varied layering (alter velocity, shift trigger points, use x-y filtering, etc…) to make your drums more dynamic or layer your own fill atop the already present fills.

    Problem solving is a skills that transfers to all aspects of life. FOSTER IT.

    Example: Oddisee – This beat is for Finale

    Watch the time signature/swing
    It blows my mind when I hear a producer try and loop a sample that’s obviously in a swing rhythm and try and make into a boom bap type track.

    …there’s a good chance you’ll never need a swing rhythm track for an MC.

    My Take

    It blows my mind when a father tells his son not to hit on a beautiful woman just because the father has yet to have success with a ‘hot woman’. Not to mention families that try to prevent their children from wanting to go to medical school, find a stable job or anything that the family members have yet to achieve. The world is bigger than ourselves.

    Listening to and sampling music with different swing and time signatures is like traveling, it allows you to learn about things unique to your home town as well as universal truths. In regards to production, you will learn about grooves, altering time signatures within one song (no more linear songs) and if you must remain at 4/4, learn about time stretching.

    Time stretching is a different animal with sound anomalies and artefacts (I love Low Fidelity music, I am biased with regards to the audio truncation that ensues so I won’t go into this).

    As a side point, I have found time signature to principally be a matter of tempo, speed up the tempo on a slow jam and it becomes easy to interpret it as the typical 4/4 time signature.

    Advice: Download the Georgia Anne Muldrow and Dudley Perkins Red Bull Music Academy interview and listen to their philosophy of time signatures. But please, use this as a reference point as opposed to an immutable gospel.

    Example: Platinum Pied Pipers – Act Like You Know (personal note: pure swing forged and focused a la boom bap)

    Example: Amelia – All the Funk I Need (not rap)

    Never underestimate filtering

    …really, you just wanna have it as a loop that will be the spine of the beat. So, filter that shit.

    My Take

    Solution orientated thinking. TWO THUMBS UP.

    There is an article floating in the interweb detailing how you can use filters (such as a phaser) to create melodies.

    Example: Slum Village – Players

    Example: Reflection Eternal – The Blast

    Some genres just don’t work

    Certain genres just aren’t made for sampling. Let’s go through some:
    1)Hawaiian music
    2)Polka
    3)old country music…

    Music that will frustrate you

    First off, Fuck free jazz. It’s the most annoying shit to try and sample cause it’s usually atonal and all over the place. I’ve found bits and pieces over the years but it meant wading through hours of pretentious mayhem disguised as music. Skip it.

    Secondly…motherfucker[s] refused to leave anything open. It’s like he’s constantly got 8 instruments going at once so you can never extract that one little sound you like.

    My Take

    Again, learn to travel. Novel ideas may be sparked from just listening to varied genres, but more important is time under fingers. Sample everything you come across. Never delete wack beats, keep them as a reminder of the ideas you tried to execute.

    Take atonal ish and try to get it into a scale only to see that pay dividends when you have to fix a singer’s vocals. Or better still, learn stitch together atonal sounds (treat music as sound and see how you view art changes) in an attempt to make it accessible to not only yourself but to the listening audience.

    A dense sample is still a sample. Sparse drums (with a lovely groove) can change the impact of the same 4 bar loop. Even better, use the filtering referred to above. Practice, practice, practice … or is it “practise”?

    Even if you fail, the experience remains.

    Example: J. Rawls (Black Star – Brown Skin Lady)

    Example: Common – Hot Shit

    The “Everything sounds the same” curse

    I’ll often come across a record that specializes in one sound. A flute, or a klezmer or a vocal group from Botswana. These records are perfect for finding layers cause they never have drums and they’re full of random little riffs that you can work with. The issue here is controlling yourself. These records are good for one, MAYBE 2 uses.

    My Take

    Lovely advice. Just to add, see the sample material for what it is. A small part of a whole. One sample may be one of many used in one song or the sole sample use in one song. Other items are necessary, drums, vocals, effects, sequencing or whatever else suits your fancy.

    After that song is done, more are needed before your have a complete project. A sample source where everything sounds the same means that you have a place to go when looking for a particular sound in the same way that sampling one genres limits the end product. As a consequence of being solution orientated:

    Diversify as opposed to Specialising.

    Example: Elaquent – The Love

    Example: Green Butter – Get Mad Relax (when the guys sampling have an “everything sounds the same” aesthetic)

    • Thanks for the…umm…advice? Honestly, I don’t know if you meant it sound like that but this entire response came off incredibly patronizing and pretentious.
      These things I listed are just how I do it. every producer has their own methods. I’ve been making beats for over 20 years and it’s been my sole job for over 10. You may work differently. But, from reading your responses I feel as though you have never heard my music. My sampling is incredibly diverse. In fact, I can’t think of many producers who have taken from as many genres as I do and blend them together. This isn’t me bragging, it’s just that , well, that’s always been my thing.

      Again, this post wasn’t a rule book. Just what I do. I will say this though, producers who do do the things I warn against tend to not be ones that make music I particularly enjoy. From the sound of it, you’re more into the theoretical aspects of making beats than the execution itself. So, by all means, don’t listen to my advice in this post. We are two very different breeds, in how we view music and its creation.

  24. What year did music stop having static noise on the high end? I made many sampled hip hop beats but I just realized I can’t make them louder because of the static in the high end. Would you not recommend youtube conversions? Do they limit how loud my sample can get because of its mp3 quality? Do all old school hip hop songs on the radio use actual cds and records for loud high quality samples?

    • The static comes from vinyl. If it’s not there, it’s either not off vinyl or a very clean record. I don’t oppose any method of sampling YOutube, mp3’s, television. Makes no difference to me.

      • So if I use take out that high end buzz with eq would that limit space for the lows/mids like my bassline and kicks? I heard spacing eq is what makes the beat as loud as possible.

      • YOu can filter some of the buzz out. I like a little crackle on my samples though. There are also plug ins that are specifically to clean up samples. I don’t know what they’re called though.

  25. this was funniest shit I’ve read in a long time. “The only problem is, for some reason, this Ponty motherfucker refused to leave anything open”. I nearly fell off my damn chair! everything made perfect sense, uncomplicated and easy to read.

  26. anyone have any tips on using a sample with vocals in it. how to filter or phase it to push it in the background so that there’s enough space for an MC?

    • Either you make it or leave it, that’s my take. What I mean is when things don’t slund tidy enough, try filtering. If it’s still sound crappy, try sound effect such as chorus, reverb, and many other stuffs. If it still doesn’t sound satisfying, maybe that thing is not to be sampled. For another time, probably, but not this time.

  27. holy fuck! i just realized Blockhead posted this! one of my exes turned me on to you and Aesop Rock. love your production on his projects and your solo albums. it’s been a minute so maybe y’all won’t see this but how would one go about filtering a sample with vocals? like say you have the sample with vocals for the hook but want to push out the vocals as much as you can during the verse. i’ve heard producers achieve this and it always baffles me. do they invert one of the channels after splitting a stereo track then make it mono and THEN filter it? if anyone can shed some light on how to go about this it’d be mad appreciated!

  28. Thanks for pointing out that it is not nice to have the drum’s sound dominating the loop or track. I guess I have to listen to the loop that I will find to ensure that I download the best one. It will be used for the video that I will be making because it will be a compilation of the adventures that we have last year with my friends.

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